Synchrony!….[Three!]

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{this is the third post in) a series of Seven Things that Improv Gives us}

Currently I’m reading ”The Boys in the Boat” at bedtime. And I’m loving it. I’m completely drawn in to the story of this nine young men – the University of Washington crew team – who persevere against all odds, and win the olympic gold in Berlin in 1936 (under Hitler). At the time all the great crew teams were Ivy League schools in the east – Harvard, Penn, Cornell, Yale, etc. University of Washington’s crew team didn’t come from a place of means. Many were sons of lumberjacks and farmers; many like Joe Rantz came through such adversity and abandonment from his own family (twice!). The author chronicles how Joe often felt like an outsider from even his own teammates. The varsity coach Al Ulbrickson kept trying new configurations of the boys in the boat. They’d do well, but then fall apart.  Then Continue reading “Synchrony!….[Three!]”

Using your body to take your place in life

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Imagine you are in an 8×12 cell in the county jail. The cell has bunk beds, so add another person. The jail is overcrowded so add a third person who sleeps on a cot on the floor. And add a toilet. You’re in this cell for 18 hours per day; if there’s an incident in the jail, then you may be in your cell for 23 hours per day. This is the situation at the Skagit County Jail where I serve on the jail chaplaincy team.  Continue reading “Using your body to take your place in life”

Inserting Trampolines

Noam Sauls drawing
[image from ”The Body Keeps the Score”. Drawing by Noam Saul]

“On September 11, 2001, five-year old Noam Saul witnessed the first passenger plane slam into the World Trade Center from the windows of his first-grade classroom at PS 234, less than 1,500 feet away. He and his classmates ran with their teacher down the stairs to the lobby, where most of them were reunited with their parents who had dropped them off at school just moments earlier. Noam, his older brother, and their dad were three of the tens of thousands of people who ran for their lives through the rubble, ash, and smoke of lower Manhattan that morning.”

This story is told by Bessel Van der Kolk M.D., in his book, “The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma”. He continues.. Continue reading “Inserting Trampolines”